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STEM Education Living Learning Community

Rich Osguthorpe Headshot

Rich Osguthorpe, Education, studio portrait

Rich Osguthorpe, Professor and Dean, College of Education[/caption]

“As a member of the STEM Education Living Learning Community, you’ll find yourself among students who are challenging themselves to be better scholars and citizens in this community and in the world. The community is a special place where you can develop closer relationships with professors and your fellow students. You will discover that education is about more than going to class, earning credits and getting a degree.

Education is a way of life. You’ll learn through community discussions, social activities and service projects. You can develop long-lasting personal and professional connections while also focusing on your academic goals. And you’ll have a whole lot of fun, too. Biking, canoeing and ice skating are just some of the many activities you’ll take part in. While having fun you will discover that you also have been learning how to develop your intellect, leadership and character.”

– Dr. Rich Osguthorpe, Professor and Dean, College of Education


What is the STEM Education Living Learning Community (STEM-Ed)?

This community is designed for students looking to live and learn in interdisciplinary teams, especially those interested in the IDoTeach program for education majors interested in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Participating in the community supports students for success in their coursework as well as information about the teacher education programs at Boise State. Students will learn about integrating STEM innovation with the study of teaching and learning, and build valuable professional experience to supplement their academic studies.

Who Should Apply

First  year students with an interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, or Education. Those interested in becoming a high school teacher are especially encouraged to apply. Applicants must commit to focusing on both the academic and social aspects of their college experience.

Curriculum:

Course Credit ED-LLC 150-001/250-001 – 1 credit

Participants live together with Community Assistant and their Faculty in Residence. Multiple (optional) social activities are coordinated every week, plus a required weekly class meeting and associated assignments. Some recently offered educational activities include:

  1. Whitewater rafting trip with professional guides
  2. Scavenger hunt around downtown Boise
  3. Group screening of a STEM Education movie
  4. Guided exploration of careers in STEM and in Education
  5. Bicycle tour of the Boise Greenbelt
  6. One-on-one midterm academic check-ins and advising
  7. Rock climbing workshop for using a roped wall
  8. Campus portrait photography session
  9. Workshop on interdisciplinary collaboration in STEM
  10. Guided reflection on building self-efficacy in college

Participation Agreement
It is an honor to be selected as a member of one of these communities, and with that honor comes individual responsibility. Students are expected to participate in a constructive manner, supporting the academic environment and success of all its members. Participation Agreement.


Current Faculty In Residence (FIR)

 

 

 

 

Matt Wigglesworth, Clinical Faculty, STEM Education – IDoTeach

Matt Wigglesworth joined Boise State University’s STEM Education program, IDoTeach, at its inception in fall of 2012. Matt teaches a variety of STEM education courses, evaluates preservice teachers as a field liaison, and serves as an advocate for undergraduate science teacher candidates as they complete their secondary certificate in STEM.

Matt has a BS in Environmental Geology and an MS in Science Education. He spent several years employed as a geoscientist on the east coast before moving west (from Pennsylvania) in 2004 to be a high school science teacher in Boise, Idaho. Since then, Matt furthered his passion for teaching has been working with STEM teachers and students throughout schools in the Treasure Valley. His research interests are in teacher collaboration and providing professional development to increase teachers efficacy in developing and teaching STEM curriculum.   

Matt enjoys life in the outdoors and has a passion for sharing that with his family and students. His wife, Gillian, and children, Talus and Juliet, will join him as the faculty-in-residence for the LLC. The family is thrilled to live on campus and share their love of community, mountains, and ice cream. When the Wigglesworths are not camping, biking, climbing, skiing, or SUPing they might be found relaxing.

 

Please click the “+” to view more details and some awesome videos.

Why Should I join STEM ED?


If you plan to live on campus, and have an interest in a STEM or education field, this a great way to jumpstart your success in college and your career. Benefits include:
  • Faculty Support – having a math professor down the hall is great while you’re doing homework
  • Career Development – ongoing advising, access to resources, and connections to scholarships and internships
  • Social Connections – structured opportunities to build valuable interpersonal and teamwork skills while getting to know a tight-knit group of 20+ other community members
  • Broadened Horizons – explore the many academic and social programs on campus that make Boise State’s STEM Education programs one of the best in the region
  • College Success – research-based strategies help ensure participants meet their academic goals and rapid progress toward a valuable degree

What Happens in the STEM-Ed Living Learning Community?

Participants live together with a Community Assistant and their Faculty in Residence. Multiple (optional) social activities are coordinated every week, plus a required weekly class meeting and associated assignments. Some recently offered educational activities include:

  1. Two day camping trip with professional guides
  2. Scavenger hunt around downtown Boise
  3. Group screening of a STEM education movie
  4. Guided exploration of careers in STEM Education
  5. Bicycle tour of the Boise Greenbelt
  6. One-on-one midterm academic check-ins and advising
  7. Rock climbing workshop for using a roped wall
  8. Campus portrait photography session
  9. Workshop on interdisciplinary collaboration in STEM
  10. Guided reflection on building self-efficacy in college

Who can participate, how many students are admitted to live there?


First  year students with an interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, or Education. Those interested in becoming a high school teacher are especially encouraged to apply. Applicants must commit to focusing on both the academic and social aspects of their college experience. Capacity is limited to 20 students.

What is the fee to participate and where do I live?


All students are required to pay for and live on campus in a residential hall with an active meal plan. In addition there is a $65.00 participation fee (per semester) assessed to your student account to supplement program activities, field trips, and general program expenses. Students will live in Taylor Hall.

How do I apply for admission?


All Living-Learning Program students must first complete an on-line Housing application. Once complete, students must apply for admission by submitting the LLP application through myhousing.boisestate.edu. Faculty review LLP Applications and make determinations based on information provided. The process is competitive so students are encouraged place appropriate time and effort into their application responses. For more information, please see admissions information on our website.

Application Questions

  1. The STEM-Ed LLC includes students interested in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Education. What strengths will you bring to helping make sure such a diverse community will enjoy living and working together?
  2. The STEM-Ed LLC activities focus on academic success, working in teams, and developing social relationships. Why are you interested in these three parts of the experience?
  3. If we asked a close friend or family member what it would be like to live with you in college, how do you think they would respond?